Slaughter, M. H., Lindstrom, J. H., & Anderson, R. (2022). Perceptions of extended time accommodations among postsecondary students with disabilities . Exceptionality , 30 (4), 246–260. https://doi.org/10.1080/09362835.2020.1727339

Journal Article
Slaughter, M. H., Lindstrom, J. H., & Anderson, R. (2022). Perceptions of extended time accommodations among postsecondary students with disabilities. Exceptionality, 30(4), 246–260. https://doi.org/10.1080/09362835.2020.1727339

Tags

Attention problem; Emotional/Behavioral disability; Extended time; Learning disabilities; Multiple disabilities; Physical disability; Postsecondary; Traumatic brain injury (TBI); U.S. context; Visual impairment (including blindness)

URL

https://www.tandfonline.com/journals/hexc20

Summary

Accommodation

The perceptions of postsecondary students with disabilities using an extended time accommodation were examined. “Extended time” refers to the provision of additional time for test taking.

Participants

Twenty-one undergraduate students with disabilities from a large, public university in the southeastern United States participated. Students ranged in age from 18 to 26 years old, with 52% female and 48% male. Disability groups represented included ADHD, learning disabilities, psychological disabilities, brain injuries, mobility disorders, sensory disorders, and systemic disorders (e.g., arthritis).

Dependent Variable

One-on-one interviews, lasting 14 minutes on average, asked students to discuss their perceptions of the extended time accommodation. Questions covered topics such as positive/negative impacts of extended time, how the students think they use the entirety of extended time allotted, and test-taking strategies they have been taught.

Findings

Six themes emerged from the interviews: 1) Frequency and usage; 2) Factors impacting usage; 3) Environment; 4) Benefits of extended time; 5) Negative consequences of extended time; and 6) Obstacles in obtaining and using extended time. 33.3% of participants reported using all of their extended time, 28.6% reported rarely using all of their extended time, and 53% reported sometimes needing more time than allotted. Test format, subject, test length, and intrapersonal characteristics impacted the amount of extended time required. Extended time reduced anxiety, gave students the opportunity to demonstrate their abilities, and improved grades. However, when given more time, students were more likely to change answers (even when the first choice was correct), and utilizing extended time could cause scheduling concerns. Additionally, institutional obstacles in obtaining extended time existed.