DeStefano, L., Shriner, J. G., & Lloyd, C. A. (2001). Teacher decision making in participation of students with disabilities in large-scale assessment . Exceptional Children , 68 (1), 7–22. https://doi.org/10.1177/001440290106800101

Journal Article

DeStefano, L., Shriner, J. G., & Lloyd, C. A. (2001). Teacher decision making in participation of students with disabilities in large-scale assessment. Exceptional Children, 68(1), 7–22. https://doi.org/10.1177/001440290106800101

Tags

Teacher survey; U.S. context

URL

http://journals.sagepub.com/home/ecx

Summary

Accommodation

The focus of the study was the impact of training on decision-making regarding assessment participation and accommodations for teachers of students with disabilities. The accommodations were those assigned by these teachers in the state of Illinois.

Participants

Teachers numbering over 100 from six school districts in Illinois (U.S.) were surveyed then provided training and surveyed a second time to examine their perspectives on accommodations decision-making. The teachers taught students with disabilities from mostly grade 10 (93%), with some teaching grade 11 (7%); additional student demographic variables were reported.

Dependent Variable

The dependent variable was teacher decision-making outcomes. These outcomes were measured prior to as well as after the training by surveys and reviews of students' individualized education programs (IEPs). The educator survey was completed pertaining to each of their students with disabilities, and inquired about student demographics, the nature of the students' education goals in seven content areas, the manner of participating in the previous and present state assessment including accommodations received, and students' instructional accommodations.

Findings

Secondary teachers (both general and special education) and administrators were provided training in making participation and accommodation decisions for students with disabilities. Prior to training, teachers were more likely to recommend full participation with accommodations on all parts of the test. A similar set of accommodations tended to be given to all students with disabilities, and students tended to receive more assessment accommodations than instructional accommodations. Following training, teachers were more likely to recommend full participation with accommodations for part of the test, partial participation in the regular test (with students taking an alternate assessment to measure other individual student goals), and full alternate assessment. Additionally, teachers had more knowledge about linking instructional and assessment accommodations after training.