Maccini, P., & Gagnon, J. C. (2006). Mathematics instructional practices and assessment accommodations by secondary special and general educators . Exceptional Children , 72 (2), 217–234. https://doi.org/10.1177/001440290607200206

Journal Article

Maccini, P., & Gagnon, J. C. (2006). Mathematics instructional practices and assessment accommodations by secondary special and general educators. Exceptional Children, 72(2), 217–234. https://doi.org/10.1177/001440290607200206

Tags

Calculation device or software (interactive); Colored lenses/overlays; Extended time; Individual; Layout/organization of test items; Manipulatives; Math; No age; No disability; Oral delivery; Oral delivery, live/in-person; Teacher survey; Templates or organizers; U.S. context

URL

http://journals.sagepub.com/home/ecx

Summary

Accommodation

This study was an examination of the associations between the use of testing accommodations, status as a special education instructor, and the number of methods courses taken by teachers. The researchers listed various accommodations for consideration: calculators, color coding, (use of) concrete objects, cue cards of strategy steps, extended time on tests, individualized attention given by class aide, problems read to students, and reduced problems on tests.

Participants

A national (U.S.) sample of 176 teachers responded to the survey. 78 (44%) were general education teachers. 122 (69%) were female. These were all educators who taught students with learning disabilities and emotional/behavioral disabilities. Additional data such as work experience and educational experience were also reported.

Dependent Variable

The participants completed a survey asking them about their use of specific instructional practices to help teach math to students with learning disabilities (LD) and emotional/behavioral disorders (EB/D) and their use of specific assessment accommodations with these students.

Findings

Although general education teachers were generally more knowledgeable about higher level mathematics content (e.g., algebra) than special education teachers, they were less likely to report that they used specific instructional practices and testing accommodations. The number of methods courses taken by teachers and knowledge of course topics both contributed to the number of instructional practices and accommodations used by teachers. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.