Huynh, H., & Barton, K. E. (2006). Performance of students with disabilities under regular and oral administrations of a high-stakes reading examination . Applied Measurement in Education , 19 (1), 21–39. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15324818ame1901_2

Journal Article

Huynh, H., & Barton, K. E. (2006). Performance of students with disabilities under regular and oral administrations of a high-stakes reading examination. Applied Measurement in Education, 19(1), 21–39. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15324818ame1901_2

Tags

Emotional/Behavioral disability; Hearing impairment (including deafness); High school; Intellectual disabilities; Learning disabilities; Multiple disabilities; No disability; Oral delivery; Physical disability; Reading; Speech/Language disability; U.S. context; Visual impairment (including blindness)

URL

https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/hame20

Summary

Accommodation

The study investigated the effect of oral administration on test structure and student performance.

Participants

Students in grade 11 participated from across South Carolina (U.S.), including students with and without disabilities who had taken the Pre-SAT in 2000. Of the total of 3,844 students with disabilities, four disability categories were predominant (about 98% of sample): learning disabilities (76%), physical disabilities (8%), intellectual disabilities (8%), and emotional-behavioral disabilities (6%). The remaining two percent included: speech/language impairment (n=72), hearing impairment (n=65), visual impairment (n=39), multiple disabilities (n=67), and no data available (n=41).

Dependent Variable

Scores on the reading test of the South Carolina High School Exit Examination served as the dependent variable.

Findings

Results indicated that the internal structure of the HSEE test remained stable across three student groups (students with disabilities-oral administration, students with disabilities-standard administration, general education-standard administration). In addition, it was concluded that oral administration accommodations served to level the playing field for students whose disabilities were presumably severe enough to require oral accommodations. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.