Kettler, R. J., Niebling, B. C., Mroch, A. A., Feldman, E. S., Newell, M. L., Elliott, S. N., Kratochwill, T. R., & Bolt, D. M. (2005). Effects of testing accommodations on math and reading scores: An experimental analysis of the performance of students with and without disabilities . Assessment for Effective Intervention , 31 (1), 37–48. https://doi.org/10.1177/073724770503100104

Journal Article

Kettler, R. J., Niebling, B. C., Mroch, A. A., Feldman, E. S., Newell, M. L., Elliott, S. N., Kratochwill, T. R., & Bolt, D. M. (2005). Effects of testing accommodations on math and reading scores: An experimental analysis of the performance of students with and without disabilities. Assessment for Effective Intervention, 31(1), 37–48. https://doi.org/10.1177/073724770503100104

Tags

Disabilities Not Specified; Elementary; Math; Middle school; Multiple accommodations; Multiple ages; No disability; Reading; Teacher survey; U.S. context

URL

http://aei.sagepub.com

Summary

Accommodation

This study examined the effects of multiple testing accommodations on the mathematics and reading test scores.

Participants

A total of 119 students in grade 4, and 78 students in grade 8, participanted from schools throughout Wisconsin (U.S.). Of these participants, 49 grade 4 students and 39 grade 8 students had disabilities. Additional demographic data such as gender and ethnicity were reported. Educators totaled 24 "secondary participants," serving as additional sources of data about student participants; for instance, they completed the Assessment Accommodation Checklist (AAC; Elliott et al., 1999) on each student participant. Disability categories or classifications were not specified for students with disabilities.

Dependent Variable

All students were tested under two conditions on equivalent forms of research editions of mathematics and reading tests from achievement tests used in many statewide assessment systems. The AAC (Elliott et al., 1999) completed by teacher participants served as an additional itemization of accommodations for each student participant as appropriate.

Findings

Results indicate that grade 4 students with disabilities benefited from testing accommodations more than students without disabilities, with a greater benefit present on reading tests. Both students with and without disabilities benefited from testing accommodations equally at the grade 8 level. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.