Lang, S. C., Kumke, P. J., Ray, C. E., Cowell, E. L., Elliott, S. N., Kratochwill, T. R., & Bolt, D. M. (2005). Consequences of using testing accommodations: Student, teacher, and parent perceptions of and reactions to testing accommodations . Assessment for Effective Intervention , 31 (1), 49–62. https://doi.org/10.1177/073724770503100105

Journal Article

Lang, S. C., Kumke, P. J., Ray, C. E., Cowell, E. L., Elliott, S. N., Kratochwill, T. R., & Bolt, D. M. (2005). Consequences of using testing accommodations: Student, teacher, and parent perceptions of and reactions to testing accommodations. Assessment for Effective Intervention, 31(1), 49–62. https://doi.org/10.1177/073724770503100105

Tags

Disabilities Not Specified; Elementary; Middle school; Student survey; Teacher survey; U.S. context

URL

http://aei.sagepub.com

Summary

Accommodation

This study examined student, parent and teacher perceptions of the use of testing accommodations and the relationship between student perceptions of testing accommodations and their disability status and grade level.

Participants

A total of 152 students (65 students with disabilities) in grade 4, and 142 grade 8 students (62 students with disabilities) from 15 schools throughout Wisconsin (U.S.). Twenty-one (21) parents of grade 4 students and 22 parents of grade 8 students participated. Thirty-five (35) educators participated, including 8 general education and 16 special education teachers.

Dependent Variable

Student participants completed math and reading achievement tests with and without accommodations; performance scores were examined for parents to comment on their face validity. Also, students, parents, and educators completed surveys about their perceptions of accommodations.

Findings

Significant differences were found in the proportions of students with and without disabilities who reported that the accommodated test condition was easier, more comfortable, and a better indicator of their knowledge. Most parents and teachers perceived testing accommodations to be fair and valid for students with disabilities. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.