Ketterlin-Geller, L. R., Alonzo, J., Braun-Monegan, J., & Tindal, G. (2007). Recommendations for accommodations:  Implications of (in)consistency . Remedial and Special Education , 28 (4), 194–206. https://doi.org/10.1177/07419325070280040101

Journal Article

Ketterlin-Geller, L. R., Alonzo, J., Braun-Monegan, J., & Tindal, G. (2007). Recommendations for accommodations:  Implications of (in)consistency. Remedial and Special Education, 28(4), 194–206. https://doi.org/10.1177/07419325070280040101

Tags

Elementary; Emotional/Behavioral disability; Extended time; Individual; Learning disabilities; Multiple accommodations; Multiple day; Multiple disabilities; Oral delivery; Reading; Simplified language; Small group; Speech/Language disability; Teacher survey; U.S. context

URL

https://journals.sagepub.com/home/rse

Summary

Accommodation

In this study, we investigated the consistency of accommodation assignments for students with individualized education programs (IEPs). Accommodations examined included extended-time, individual/small group, multiple sessions, read-aloud, and simplified text.

Participants

Participants included 38 grade 3 students with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), and the 14 teachers who made accommodations decisions for them, from six elementary schools across two districts in the Pacific Northwest (U.S.). Sixteen students were identified as having communication disorders, 11 were labeled with a specific learning disability, 3 were classified as having a behavioral disorder, and 8 students had a combination of learning disabilities with communication or behavioral disorders.

Dependent Variable

The dependent variables were a Survey of Teacher Recommendations for Accommodation (developed by the researchers); IEPs; and reading competency measures, including silent reading fluency and a maze task for comprehension.

Findings

The researchers reported inconsistencies between teachers' recommendations and the accommodations listed on the IEPs. Similar results were observed when comparing either IEPs or teacher recommendations with students' performance. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.