Cawthon, S. W., & Online Research Lab. (2008). Accommodations use for statewide standardized assessments: Prevalence and recommendations for students who are deaf or hard of hearing . Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education , 13 (1), 55–96. https://doi.org/10.1093/deafed/enm029

Journal Article

Cawthon, S. W., & Online Research Lab. (2008). Accommodations use for statewide standardized assessments: Prevalence and recommendations for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 13(1), 55–96. https://doi.org/10.1093/deafed/enm029

Tags

Extended time; Individual; Math; No age; No disability; Oral delivery; Oral delivery, live/in-person; Reading; Signed administration; Signed response; Simplified language; Small group; Teacher survey; U.S. context

URL

http://jdsde.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/enm029v1

Summary

Accommodation

Many accommodations were investigated, comprising those used on 2004–2005 statewide standardized assessments across the nation. Details were provided about dictated (signed) response, extended time, individual/small group administration, interpreter for directions and for items, oral delivery, and "simplified English."

Participants

A total of 444 educators who served over 9,000 students with hearing impairments as teachers, administrators, or other educational professionals from across the U.S. responded to the survey. Data describing the population of K​–12 students with hearing impairments including deafness were also reported.

Dependent Variable

The educator survey—the Second Annual National Survey on Assessments and Accommodations for Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing—had three sections, including demographics, perspectives on accommodations, and perspectives on alternate assessment. The survey consisted of multiple-choice, scaling, and open-ended response items.

Findings

The most widely used accommodations were small-group testing, interpreting test directions, and extended time. With the exception of interpreting or reading test items aloud, accommodations were largely used for both reading and math assessments. Participants perceived all listed accommodations as both valid and easy to use. Participants recommended that student academic level, communication mode, and additional disabilities be taken into account when choosing accommodations for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.