Bouck, E. C., Flanagan, S., & Joshi, G. S. (2011). Speaking math—A voice input, speech output calculator for students with visual impairments . Journal of Special Education Technology , 26 (4), 1–14. https://doi.org/10.1177/016264341102600401

Journal Article

Bouck, E. C., Flanagan, S., & Joshi, G. S. (2011). Speaking math—A voice input, speech output calculator for students with visual impairments. Journal of Special Education Technology, 26(4), 1–14. https://doi.org/10.1177/016264341102600401

Tags

Calculation device or software (interactive); Dictated response; Dictated response (speech recognition system); High school; Math; U.S. context; Visual impairment (including blindness)

URL

http://www.tamcec.org/publications/jset/

Summary

Accommodation

The voice-input, speech-output (VISO) calculator was examined; this tool utilizes aspects of dictated-response and speech-recognition when applied to an assessment setting. The use of the VISO calculator was compared to each participant's typical calculation method.

Participants

Three high school students at a state school for the blind in the Midwest (U.S.) participated. They were all 18–19 years old.

Dependent Variable

The effect of the accommodation was measured through observing (1) the average number of attempts per math problem and (2) the completion time on a 10-item assessment of basic operations calculations. Twenty assessments were developed. The correctness score on assessments was not emphasized, in part, because calculator use was assumed to result in correct responses. An interview protocol yielded participants' comments about their testing experiences when using the VISO calculator software.

Findings

Participants were faster and took fewer attempts to complete 10-item tests using their typical strategies than using the VISO calculator. However, they increased in speed and decreased in average number of attempts between their first tests and last tests. The researchers observed the students expressing frustration when using the VISO calculator, although the students also did so when using their typical strategies. Two of the students reported feeling more independence when using the VISO calculator, as their typical strategies relied on personal assistance. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research directions were suggested.