Cawthon, S. W., Leppo, R., & PEPNET 2 Research and Evidence Synthesis Team, . (2013). Accommodations quality for students who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing . American Annals of the Deaf , 158 (4), 438–452. https://doi.org/10.1353/aad.2013.0031

Journal Article

Cawthon, S. W., Leppo, R., & PEPNET 2 Research and Evidence Synthesis Team, . (2013). Accommodations quality for students who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. American Annals of the Deaf, 158(4), 438–452. https://doi.org/10.1353/aad.2013.0031

Tags

No age; U.S. context

URL

http://gupress.gallaudet.edu/annals/

Summary

Accommodation

Accommodations use and perceptions about accommodations were focuses of the study; several accommodations were detailed, and this summary emphasizes assessment-related accommodations.

Participants

Participants were professionals (n=1,350) in various roles including educators and service providers supporting secondary and postsecondary students with deafness and hearing impairments.

Dependent Variable

Professionals in various roles responded to online surveys, and participated in interviews and focus groups, about accommodations use and quality.

Findings

The accommodations most commonly reported by participants for their students included interpreters (75%), captioning media (64%), and sound amplification (63%). The settings in which accommodations use incidence were reported included at the secondary level—with 82% using captioning and 81% using interpreters—and postsecondary level—with 92% using interpreters and 76% using captioning. The provision of interpreters by video remote was very uncommon at the secondary level but much more common at the postsecondary level, and the researchers noted the potential for students transitioning to postsecondary education settings to benefit from being oriented to technology resources. The researchers indicated that participants endorsed some accommodations as both high in quality and high in consistency, including interpreter, captioning, and speech to text. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research directions were suggested.