Calhoon, M. B., Fuchs, L. S., & Hamlett, C. L. (2000). Effects of computer-based test accommodations on mathematics performance assessments for secondary students with learning disabilities . Learning Disability Quarterly , 23 (4), 271–282. https://doi.org/10.2307/1511349

Journal Article

Calhoon, M. B., Fuchs, L. S., & Hamlett, C. L. (2000). Effects of computer-based test accommodations on mathematics performance assessments for secondary students with learning disabilities. Learning Disability Quarterly, 23(4), 271–282. https://doi.org/10.2307/1511349

Tags

Electronic administration; Electronic administration; Electronic administration; High school; Learning disabilities; Math; Oral delivery; Oral delivery, live/in-person; Reading; Text-to-speech device/software; U.S. context

URL

http://www.council-for-learning-disabilities.org/learning-disability-quarterly-journal

Summary

Accommodation

Each student completed the tests under each of the following four conditions: standard administration, teacher read-aloud, computer read-aloud, and computer read-aloud with video.

Participants

Eighty-one high school students (grades 9–12) identified as having LD, who were receiving math and reading instruction in special education resource rooms and had reading and math IEP goals, participated, from an unidentified state (U.S.). Approximately 60% of the participants were male (40% female), 61% were African American, 37% were Caucasian, and 2% were of other racial backgrounds.

Dependent Variable

A maze reading test (Fuchs & Fuchs, 1992) was used to establish reading levels for each student. Four third-grade math performance assessments were also used. Each began with a narrative describing the problem, and presenting students with tabular and graphic information for potential application of the performance assessment. Each problem included four questions. Each assessment was scored using a rubric structured along four dimensions: conceptual underpinning, computational applications, problem solving, and communication. A student questionaire was also developed to explore students' perceptions of the benefits of accommodations, and what students thought about their performance on the test.

Findings

Teacher-read, computer-read, and computer-read with video conditions significantly increased performance assessment scores over the standard administration condition. There were no significant differences among teacher-read, computer-read, and computer-read with video conditions. Effect sizes, however, between the standard administration condition and each of the accommodated conditions were weak. Students with learning disabilities of all reading ability levels (based on the reading maze test) were found to significantly benefit from the accommodations. Students were found to prefer the teacher-read, computer-read, and computer-read with video accommodations comparably.