Sniatecki, J. L., Perry, H. B., & Snell, L. H. (2015). Faculty attitudes and knowledge regarding college students with disabilities . Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability , 28 (3), 259–275. https://www.ahead.org/professional-resources/publications/jped

Journal Article
Sniatecki, J. L., Perry, H. B., & Snell, L. H. (2015). Faculty attitudes and knowledge regarding college students with disabilities. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 28(3), 259–275. https://www.ahead.org/professional-resources/publications/jped

Notes

[no doi reported]; also located on ERIC online database

Tags

Accommodation/s not specified; Emotional/Behavioral disability; Learning disabilities; No disability; Postsecondary; U.S. context

URL

https://www.ahead.org/professional-resources/publications/jped

Summary

Accommodation

Nearly 98% of respondents reported that they knew that testing accommodations were offered by the Disability Services office. A small proportion of faculty held negative attitudes toward students with disabilities and the accommodations they received. Researchers concluded that addressing misconceptions about students with disabilities and/or accommodations would likely lead to an improved college experience for these students.

Participants

Part- and full-time faculty members (n=123) at a mid-sized, public postsecondary institution in New York (U.S.) participated.

Dependent Variable

An online survey with 30 items was used to assess faculty attitudes and knowledge of students with disabilities. Questions addressed the following areas: the potential for students with disabilities to succeed in college, knowledge of students with disabilities' participation in postsecondary education, available resources for these students, and attitudes toward accommodations.

Findings

Nearly 98% of respondents reported that they knew that testing accommodations were offered by the Disability Services office. A small proportion of faculty held negative attitudes toward students with disabilities and the accommodations they received. Researchers concluded that addressing misconceptions about students with disabilities and/or accommodations would likely lead to an improved college experience for these students.