Huesman, R. L., Jr. (1999). The validity of ITBS reading comprehension test scores for learning disabled and non learning disabled students under extended-time conditions (Publication No. 9933381) [Doctoral dissertation, University of Iowa]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Huesman, R. L., Jr. (1999). The validity of ITBS reading comprehension test scores for learning disabled and non learning disabled students under extended-time conditions (Publication No. 9933381) [Doctoral dissertation, University of Iowa]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

UMI# 9933381 University of Iowa

Tags

Extended time; Learning disabilities; Middle school; No disability; Reading; U.S. context

Summary

Accommodation

Learning disabled and non-learning disabled students were tested under both extended-time and standard time conditions. At the end of the standard time limit, students marked where they were in the test, and then were given additional 20-minute block(s) of time to complete the test if they were not finished. Some students were told to work at a normal rate and others were told to take their time and work carefully.

Participants

Participants were students in grade 6, including 129 (25%) students with learning disabilities, and 397 (74%) students without learning disabilities; participants attended two large school districts in Iowa (U.S.).

Dependent Variable

The average Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS) reading scores for each group was calculated (state assessment extant data).

Findings

For students without learning disabilities given directions to work at a normal rate, there was little difference in test performance between timing conditions. For students without learning disabilties given directions to take time and work carefully, student test performance increased in the extended time condition. A similar result occurred for students with learning disabilities; however, not to the same extent as with students without learning disabilities. Results support the hypothesis that students with learning disabilities make significantly larger gains on the ITBS Reading Comprehension Test under extended time than students without learning disabilities who received appropriate timing instructions. Students without learning disabilities given instructions to take their time did not perform any differently than students with learning disabilities under extended-time conditions. [See also Huesman & Frisbie, 2000]