Jensen, H. K. (1997). Differences in reading comprehension between college students with learning disabilities and college students without learning disabilties on the Nelson Denny Reading Test as related to question type and length of test (Publication No. 9807689) [Doctoral dissertation, University of North Dakota]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Jensen, H. K. (1997). Differences in reading comprehension between college students with learning disabilities and college students without learning disabilties on the Nelson Denny Reading Test as related to question type and length of test (Publication No. 9807689) [Doctoral dissertation, University of North Dakota]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

University of North Dakota AAT 9807689

Tags

Extended time; Learning disabilities; No disability

Summary

Accommodation

The tests were given under two conditions: timed and untimed (extended-time).

Participants

A total of 22 college students participated: 12 students without learning disabilities (LD), 10 students with LD.

Dependent Variable

A computerized version of the comprehension subtest in the Nelson-Denny Reading Test was used (forms G and H). The computerized test records the students reading rates, response times to questions, and question answers.

Findings

The results show that there was a significant difference between students with LD and students without LD on the timed test, regardless of order of presentation. This difference was also found between students with LD and students without LD if the untimed test was presented second. However, there was no significant difference between the students with LD and stunts without LD if the untimed test was administered first. Additionally, reading rates for students with LD are significantly longer than the students without LD in all testing conditions and students with LD take longer than their peers without LD to answer implicit question versus literal questions. Also, the group differences for the number of questions correct was usually larger for the implicit question than for the literal questions.