Dempsey, K. M. (2004). The impact of additional time on LSAT scores: Does time really matter? The efficacy of making decisions on a case-by-case basis (Publication No. 3108290) [Doctoral dissertation, La Salle University (Pennsylvania)]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global. https://www.proquest.com/docview/305047125

Dissertation
Dempsey, K. M. (2004). The impact of additional time on LSAT scores: Does time really matter? The efficacy of making decisions on a case-by-case basis (Publication No. 3108290) [Doctoral dissertation, La Salle University (Pennsylvania)]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global. https://www.proquest.com/docview/305047125

Notes

La Salle University (Philadelphia, PA); ProQuest document ID 305047125

Tags

Attention problem; College entrance test; Extended time; Learning disabilities; Postsecondary; U.S. context

URL

https://www.proquest.com/docview/305047125

Summary

Accommodation

This study examines the relationship between cognitive test data and Law School Admission Test (LSAT) performance as well as the effects of being granted additional test time to take the LSAT. This study also evaluated the difference between candidates’ standard and accommodated LSAT scores and their predicted LSAT scores.

Participants

Two hundred subjects were randomly selected from those candidates who requested accommodations during the February 2001–June 2002 LSAT processing cycle and were denied accommodations, in a nationwide (U.S.) dataset. Participants reported either Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or a learning disability (LD) limiting performance under standard test conditions. All participants had at least one reportable LSAT score under standardized test conditions.

Dependent Variable

A total of 13 variables were collected from each participant's file. These cognitive test scores were correlated with LSAT results obtained under normal testing conditions. Subjects were administered the LSAT under extended time conditions.

Findings

The verbal comprehension index was identified as the score that most closely predicts LSAT performance. This study found that scores earned under accommodated conditions are better than those earned under standard conditions.