Antalek, E. E. (2005). The relationships between specific learning disability attributes and written language: A study of the performance of learning disabled high school subjects completing the TOWL-3. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section A. Humanities and Social Sciences , 65 (11). Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/305006698/abstract

Dissertation

Antalek, E. E. (2005). The relationships between specific learning disability attributes and written language: A study of the performance of learning disabled high school subjects completing the TOWL-3. Dissertation Abstracts International: Section A. Humanities and Social Sciences, 65(11). Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/305006698/abstract

Notes

UMI# 3154958 Clark University

Tags

Extended time; High school; Learning disabilities; Multiple disabilities; U.S. context; Writing

URL

http://search.proquest.com/docview/305006698/abstract

Summary

Accommodation

This study involved the performance data for students with learning disabilities on a timed writing task and the efficacy of the extended-time accommodation.

Participants

The data from the client files of 67 students from a private urban high school in Massachusetts (U.S.) were analyzed. All of the participants exhibited learning disabilities ranging from dyslexia, nonverbal learning disabilities, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and/or other neurobehavioral or neuropsychological factors.

Dependent Variable

Performance on the Test of Written Language, third edition (TOWL-3) served as the dependent variable.

Findings

While the majority of participants used additional time to complete the writing task, no relationships were found between demographic factors such as gender, age, school type and grade and the completion of the task within the allotted time. Also, all participants produced tests faster when given extended time. Students may have felt compelled “to wrap it up,” spent more time planning, or gained momentum during the task. Additional time contributed to improved performance. A significant relationship was noted between the quality of sentence structure and extended-time testing conditions. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.