Wolf, J. (2007). The effects of testing accommodations usage on students’ standardized test scores for deaf and hard-of-hearing students in Arizona public schools (Publication No. 3268570) [Doctoral dissertation, The University of Arizona]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Wolf, J. (2007). The effects of testing accommodations usage on students’ standardized test scores for deaf and hard-of-hearing students in Arizona public schools (Publication No. 3268570) [Doctoral dissertation, The University of Arizona]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

UMI# 3268570 The University of Arizona

Tags

Elementary; Extended time; Hearing impairment (including deafness); High school; Middle school; Multiple ages; Reading; U.S. context

Summary

Accommodation

The purposes of this study were to: (a) document the use of testing accommodations by students who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH), (b) identify the types and frequency of testing accommodations required by D/HH students attending general education classes in Arizona public schools, and (c) to analyze the relationships between type and degree of hearing loss and Stanford 9 achievement for students who are D/HH in Arizona public schools.

Participants

Participants had varying degrees of hearing loss, and received instruction from teachers of deaf/hard of hearing students and other support personnel, from across general education grade levels (grade 3 through grade 12) in Arizona (U.S.). The participants included 62 students in the first year of the study, and 53 students in the second year.

Dependent Variable

The dependent variable was the Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition (Stanford 9) test Total Reading and Total Language subtests in the state of Arizona.

Findings

Extended-time was the most frequently required accommodation. Principal components analysis resulted in clustering of accommodations variables into three components in 2002: Time and Administration, Presentation, and Student Directed, and four components in 2003: Presentation and Administration, Time and Materials, Response, and Student Directed. The accommodations used and their clustering were similar to those reported in the literature. Type of hearing loss was found to significantly affect reading achievement even when controlling for testing accommodations. The interaction between type and degree of loss significantly affected language achievement. Results demonstrated the reading and language achievement performance of students with mild and high frequency hearing loss fell behind students having greater levels of hearing loss. The use of testing accommodations resulted in mixed effects on student reading and language achievement performance. Changes in language scores, but not in reading scores, were found. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.