Brown, W. M. (2007). Virginia teachers’ perceptions and knowledge of test accommodations for students with disabilities (Publication No. 3254404; p. 950) [Doctoral dissertation, The College of William and Mary]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Brown, W. M. (2007). Virginia teachers’ perceptions and knowledge of test accommodations for students with disabilities (Publication No. 3254404; p. 950) [Doctoral dissertation, The College of William and Mary]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

UMI# 3254404 The College of William and Mary

Tags

Multiple accommodations; Multiple ages; Teacher survey; U.S. context

Summary

Accommodation

The study's purpose was to examine teachers' perceptions and knowledge of test accommodations in general for students with disabilities.

Participants

A total of 600 general education and special education teachers in Virginia (U.S.) responded to teacher surveys.

Dependent Variable

The survey collected information on teachers' perceptions of their own preparedness, the fairness and helpfulness of test accommodations, and their basic knowledge of test accommodations for students with disabilities.

Findings

Teachers reported that they were generally confident in their knowledge, but that they perceived their college teacher preparation programs and, to a lesser extent, their staff development programs, were lacking. In regards to the fairness of test accommodations both special and general education teachers also felt that it is fair that only students with disabilities and English as a Second Language students receive test accommodations. Both groups also perceived that all 10 of the specific test accommodations presented in the survey were either very helpful or helpful to students and that reading the test aloud was the most helpful test accommodation.

Both special education teachers and general education teachers demonstrated a very good knowledge of test accommodations for students with disabilities. There was little difference between the two groups in their knowledge of test accommodations for students with disabilities. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.