Finizio, N. J., II. (2008). The relationship between instructional and assessment accommodations on student IEPs in a single urban school district (Publication No. 3313763) [Doctoral dissertation, University of Massachusetts Boston]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Finizio, N. J., II. (2008). The relationship between instructional and assessment accommodations on student IEPs in a single urban school district (Publication No. 3313763) [Doctoral dissertation, University of Massachusetts Boston]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

UMI# 3313763 University of Massachusetts Boston

Tags

At time beneficial to student; Audio recording device/software (Response); Autism; Braille; Breaks during testing; Calculation chart (static); Calculation device or software (interactive); Clarify directions; Color contrast device or software; Cueing; Dictated response; Dictated response (scribe); Dictated response (speech recognition system); Electronic administration; Electronic administration; Electronic administration; Enlarged print (on paper); Examiner familiarity; Grammar checker; High school; Individual; Intellectual disabilities; Learning disabilities; Line reading device or software; Magnification device or software; Manipulatives; Mark answer in test booklet; Math; Middle school; Oral delivery; Oral delivery of directions only; Oral delivery, live/in-person; Reading; Seat location/proximity; Signed administration; Signed response; Small group; Specialized setting; Speech/Language disability; Spelling checker; Student reads aloud (to self); Technological aid; Templates or organizers; Text-to-speech device/software; U.S. context; Word prediction; Word processing (for writing)

Summary

Accommodation

This study examined the possible match between instructional and assessment accommodations on Individualized Educational Programs (IEPs), whether this match changed between SY 2000–2001 and SY 2005–2006 (with policy change) and to inquire about relationship among accommodations assignment and disability category. Specific accommodations (n=32) studied were those provided naturalistically to students with disabilities in a school district, and were specified for each of the participants on IEPs.

Participants

Participants were 39 students in grades 8 and 10 at middle and high schools in an urban district in Massachusetts (U.S.). All participants had disabilities. There were 27 students with specific learning disability, 5 students with communication impairment, 4 students with neurological impairment, 1 student with intellectual impairment, 1 student with autism, and 1 student with health impairment. A district population description was also provided.

Dependent Variable

The students' IEPs, which specified each student's set of instructional and assessment accommodations, formed the dependent variable of the study. These data were collected and a full document of all of the accommodations was compiled for purpose of the comparisons.

Findings

Results indicated that accommodations use increased over time, accommodation match increased over time, accommodation assignment was not disability-specific, accommodation match was not disability-specific, and some accommodations may be specific to instruction or assessment rather than identical in both settings. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.