Middleton, K. V. (2007). The effect of a read-aloud accommodation on items on a reading comprehension test for students with reading-based learning disabilities (Publication No. 3281388) [Doctoral dissertation, University of Iowa]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Middleton, K. V. (2007). The effect of a read-aloud accommodation on items on a reading comprehension test for students with reading-based learning disabilities (Publication No. 3281388) [Doctoral dissertation, University of Iowa]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

UMI# 3281388 University of Iowa

Tags

Elementary; Extended time; Learning disabilities; Middle school; No disability; Oral delivery; Reading; U.S. context

Summary

Accommodation

The effects and appropriateness of an oral delivery ("read-aloud") accommodation, provided to students during an assessment via CDs on individual CD players with headsets, were investigated.

Participants

Participants were 1,181 grade 4 and 847 grade 8 students from 84 schools throughout New Jersey (U.S.). Students without disabilities (N=1,125), and students with reading-based learning disabilities (RLD; N=903), were compared: Students without reading-based learning disabilities who did not receive an accommodation (NRLD-non-accommodated) were compared to NRLD-accommodated students, and RLD-accommodated and RLD-non-accommodated students. Demographic characteristics including sex and ethnicity were reported.

Dependent Variable

Participants completed the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests (GMRT), Fourth Edition, subtest measuring reading comprehension. Two parallel forms were used—Form S and Form T, which consisted of 48 multiple-choice items, pertaining to 11 short reading passages.

Findings

In most cases, it was found that tests were relatively easier for RLD students when administered under accommodated than under non-accommodated conditions. Results were clearer for grade 4 than for grade 8 students. These results also suggest that the construct for RLD students is more similar to the construct for NRLD students when both groups are assessed without the read-aloud accommodation than when the RLD students are assessed with the accommodation. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.