Jerome, M. K. (2007). The state of accommodations for fifth grade students with disabilities on the Virginia SOL reading, writing, and math tests (Publication No. 3289706) [Doctoral dissertation, George Mason University]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Jerome, M. K. (2007). The state of accommodations for fifth grade students with disabilities on the Virginia SOL reading, writing, and math tests (Publication No. 3289706) [Doctoral dissertation, George Mason University]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

UMI# 3289706 George Mason University

Tags

Elementary; Intellectual disabilities; Learning disabilities; Math; Multiple accommodations; Physical disability; Reading; Speech/Language disability; U.S. context; Writing

Summary

Accommodation

The purpose of the study was to examine the use of test accommodations as offered across a state, and the impact of accommodations on the statewide performance of students with disabilities in large-scale assessments.

Participants

An extant database of student characteristics and assessment results in Virginia (U.S.) included 11,064 writing scores, 13,606 math scores, and 15,212 reading scores from grade 5 students with disabilities. Students with specific learning disabilities (SLD) encompassed nearly half (49.2%) of the data set of examinees with a disability, followed by students with other health impairments (OHI) at 15.5% and speech language impairments (SLI) with 11.8%. However, other disability groups such as severe disabilities (SD) and deaf-blindness (DB) represent less than 0.1% of the testing sample.

Dependent Variable

The dependent variable was scores on Virginia Standards of Learning Programs (SOLs) 2004 English: Reading, Literature & Research Test, English: Writing Test, and the Mathematics Test.

Findings

Results from this study indicate that 77.9% of students with disabilities utilized accommodation during assessment, while 70% of students used more than one accommodation. The pass rate of all students with disabilities was consistently lower than the state reported pass rate for all grade 5 students on the Spring 2004 administration, with students using accommodations having the lowest performance rate. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.