Enriquez, M. (2008). Examining the effects of linguistic accommodations on the Colorado Student Assessment Program - Mathematics (Publication No. 3337051) [Doctoral dissertation, University of Denver]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Enriquez, M. (2008). Examining the effects of linguistic accommodations on the Colorado Student Assessment Program - Mathematics (Publication No. 3337051) [Doctoral dissertation, University of Denver]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

UMI# 3337051 University of Denver; also accessible at the University of Denver's digital commons webpage: https://digitalcommons.du.edu/etd/184/

Tags

Elementary; High school; Interpreter; Interpreter; Language; Math; Middle school; Multiple ages; Multiple content; No disability; Oral delivery of directions only; Recorded delivery (audio or video); U.S. context

Summary

Accommodation

This study examined to what extent linguistic accommodation led to improvement in test performance of English learners using ELP scores from the Colorado English Language Acquisition Assessment (CELApro) and Mathematics scores from the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP) along with iii student background variables.

Participants

A total of 72,573 students' state assessment data in Colorado (U.S.) were analyzed, including 42,981 non-English proficient or limited English proficient students. Among the more than 70,000 students were 5,118 students with IEPs, or approximately 12% of the student total.

Dependent Variable

A post-hoc analysis was completed on extant data of the 2008 scale score and performance level data from the Colorado English Language Acquisition Assessment (CELApro) and Mathematics scores from the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP).

Findings

The results of this study suggest that Translated Oral Scripts seemed to make the biggest difference for all grade levels in terms of association with higher CSAP performance. Students using word-to-word dictionaries also showed increased performance for grades 8 and 10. Students with lower levels of English proficiency tended to benefit more from receiving accommodations than students with higher proficiency. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research possibilities were suggested.