Bayles, M. (2009). Perceptions of educators and parents of the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) requirement for students with disabilities (Publication No. 3397119) [Doctoral dissertation, California Lutheran University]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Bayles, M. (2009). Perceptions of educators and parents of the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) requirement for students with disabilities (Publication No. 3397119) [Doctoral dissertation, California Lutheran University]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

UMI# 3397119 California Lutheran University

Tags

Teacher survey; U.S. context

Summary

Accommodation

The accommodations under study were not specified, but rather were understood to be those established by the IEP teams of the students with disabilities. Impact of accommodations was one of the featured research inquiries regarding the experiences with the graduation test.

Participants

Participants were 9 special education teachers, 9 administrators, and 9 parents of students with disabilities at all educational levels in a California school district (U.S.). For each school level—elementary, middle, and high school—3 administrators and 3 special education teachers, and 3 parents of students with disabilities participated in either interviews, surveys, or both. The disabilities of the students were not reported in detail.

Dependent Variable

Note: this qualitative research study explored the experiences of various professionals and parents with the graduation test —"dependent variable" is not formally predefined in qualitative inquiry.

Findings

The degree of detail in the information available to professionals varied based on educational level, with high school educators having most familiarity with details pertaining to students with disabilities; there was inconsistent communication among the participant groups at the elementary and middle school levels. Some themes related to accommodations include accountability and standardized curriculum, as well as teacher effectiveness in using accommodations, although there was different application of core curriculum materials for their students with disabilities. Most teachers noted that the use of specially selected and appropriate supplemental materials allowed their students to access the standardized curriculum. Additional details of the use of accommodations were reported by the professionals.