Byrd, T. D. M. (2010). East Tennessee State University faculty attitudes and student perceptions in providing accommodations to students with disabilities (Publication No. 3424341) [Doctoral dissertation, East Tennessee State University]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Byrd, T. D. M. (2010). East Tennessee State University faculty attitudes and student perceptions in providing accommodations to students with disabilities (Publication No. 3424341) [Doctoral dissertation, East Tennessee State University]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

East Tennessee State University

Tags

Attention problem; Emotional/Behavioral disability; Extended time; Hearing impairment (including deafness); Learning disabilities; Multiple disabilities; Physical disability; Postsecondary; Specialized setting; Teacher survey; U.S. context; Visual impairment (including blindness)

Summary

Accommodation

Accommodations examined include both classroom and course accommodations as well as testing accommodations. Test accommodations addressed in the faculty survey include extended time, low distraction room, alterations to exam, and alterations to answer sheet.

Participants

Participants were 120 faculty members and 6 students at East Tennessee State University (U.S.). Demographic data for faculty members were detailed. The student participants included 3 undergraduate students—one with ADD, one with blindness, and one with dyslexia—and 3 graduate students—one with deafness, one with a psychiatric disability and learning disability, and one with an orthopedic impairment.

Dependent Variable

The dependent variables included online attitudinal surveys completed by faculty, and student responses to interview questions.

Findings

Content analysis of student participants' interview responses yields that they perceived faculty members' attitudes about accommodations to be generally positive. Substantial detail about student perceptions was reported. Survey analysis results indicated that faculty members expressed agreement that test accommodations are necessary for student success, at a rate of 78% of respondents. When identifying specific accommodations, 85% agreed/strongly agreed with comfort allowing extended time, and 92% with low-distraction setting. Regarding test alterations, 47% indicated comfort with altering the exam, and 87% with provided an alternate answer sheet. Further data were reported about respondents' suggestions for accommodations.