Ihori, D. K. (2012). Postsecondary faculty attitudes, beliefs, practices, and knowledge regarding students with ADHD: A comparative analysis of two-year and four-year institutions (Publication No. 3513782) [Doctoral dissertation, University of Southern California]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Ihori, D. K. (2012). Postsecondary faculty attitudes, beliefs, practices, and knowledge regarding students with ADHD: A comparative analysis of two-year and four-year institutions (Publication No. 3513782) [Doctoral dissertation, University of Southern California]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

UMI# 3513782 University of Southern California

Tags

Postsecondary; Teacher survey; U.S. context

Summary

Accommodation

The accommodations were those that were reported to be provided in two-year and four-year postsecondary institutions.

Participants

Faculty members (N=327) in the Los Angeles, California (U.S.) area at 2 two-year community colleges and 4 four-year postsecondary institutions—2 public, 2 private—provided their perspectives on attitudes and beliefs as well as knowledge and practices about accommodations for students with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

Dependent Variable

The online survey of instructors was adapted from the Productive Learning University Strategies (PLuS) survey (Murray, Wren, & Keys, 2008). The PLuS survey measured 12 factors, such as perceptions of providing major accommodations, willingness to provide accommodations during exams, expectations of performance of students with disabilities, and perception of the fairness of providing accommodations.

Findings

There were no significant differences in survey response patterns of participants based on being at two-year or four-year institutions, nor any differences based on being at public or private four-year institutions. That is, faculty members had similar attitudes and beliefs about students with ADHD, similar knowledge bases about legal protections for students with ADHD, and similar willingness to accommodate students with ADHD. A small proportion—10–20% or so—of the survey responses across the participant population indicated limited knowledge about aspects of accommodations. For example, about 20% indicated disagreement with accommodating students with ADHD on the response method for exams, and 25% expressed disagreement with permitting laptop, calculator, or spell checker during exams. The researcher made recommendations about improving the learning experiences of students with ADHD, pertaining to referral for supportive services and professional development needs of faculty, as well as appropriate accommodations for students with ADHD. Limitations of the study were reported, and future research directions were suggested.