Detrick-Grove, T. L. (2016). Teachers’ perceptions and knowledge of accommodations for students with disabilities (Publication No. 10191479) [Doctoral dissertation, Frostburg State University]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Dissertation

Detrick-Grove, T. L. (2016). Teachers’ perceptions and knowledge of accommodations for students with disabilities (Publication No. 10191479) [Doctoral dissertation, Frostburg State University]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

Notes

Frostburg State University

Tags

Teacher survey; U.S. context

Summary

Accommodation

The focus was teachers' knowledge about, and perceptions of, at least 40 various types of accommodations permitted by state policy for use during state assessments in Maryland (as itemized by this researcher). Ten accommodations were further examined in terms of their degree of helpfulness: breaks, large print, mark in test booklets, preferential seating, read-aloud directions, read-aloud items, simplifying directions, small group testing, spelling dictionary, and word processor.

Participants

Survey participants consisted of a group of general education teachers (n=194) and special education teachers (n=44) from three rural Maryland school districts. Teachers taught kindergarten through 12th grade.

Dependent Variable

The researcher surveyed teachers about their perceptions and knowledge of accommodations for students with disabilities. The survey had 30 questions, seeking demographic data; self-assessments of their capacities to provide accommodations; and perceptions about fairness of accommodations in general, and about the usefulness of ten specific accommodations. The survey also contained an objective quiz about teachers' knowledge about accommodations. [This study was a replication of a dissertation study by W. M. Brown in 2007 in Virginia, using similar procedures and measures.]

Findings

Analysis of the teachers’ survey responses revealed their perceptions and knowledge of accommodations for students with disabilities. First, teachers felt that their employers prepared them to provide accommodations for students with disabilities, more so than their college education programs. Second, accommodations were reported to be viewed as fair by teachers; no distinctions were made among or across teacher characteristics about any variation in that overall perception. Teachers viewed all ten accommodations specified by the researcher as helpful; on a scale of 1-5, the means were all above 2.5 indicating more helpful than not. The highest means were reading directions (3.5) and reading test items aloud (3.4), and the lowest means were word processor and spelling dictionary (both 2.8). Last, a little over 90% of the teachers answered 6 out of 10 questions related to accommodations correctly. These findings were very similar to the findings of the previous study by W. M. Brown (2007). Limitations of the study were reported, and future research directions were suggested.