Kalyani, K., & Taj, H. (2021). Assistive technology in relation to performance of students with intellectual disability . International Research Journal on Advanced Science Hub , 3 (7S), 60–64. https://doi.org/10.47392/irjash.2021.210

Journal Article

Kalyani, K., & Taj, H. (2021). Assistive technology in relation to performance of students with intellectual disability. International Research Journal on Advanced Science Hub, 3(7S), 60–64. https://doi.org/10.47392/irjash.2021.210

Tags

Educator survey; International (non-U.S.); No age; Technological aid

URL

http://www.rspsciencehub.com

Summary

Accommodation

The range of assistive technologies (AT) were described, and examples were offered [Note: this summary emphasizes assessment-related supports]: (a) low-tech AT, lacking complicated features and not requiring extensive training (e.g., highlighter, magnifiers, large-print, colored text, specialized pen grippers); (b) mid-tech assistive technology, potentially requiring some training (e.g., alternate keyboards, amplifiers, audio recorders, closed caption televisions (CCTV), laptop computers, mouse, mp3 players, portable notetaking devices, talking calculators, talking spell checkers, and touch screens); (c) high-tech AT, requiring training and effort to use (e.g., automated electronic aids, hands-free headsets, magnification software, speech recognition software, and voice-activated telephones).

Participants

The study sample included 200 teachers at a special education school, focusing on intellectual disability, in Bangalore, India.

Dependent Variable

Researcher-developed teacher-report rubrics served to document performance of students with intellectual disabilities in three areas: cognitive, psychomotor, and social. This summary emphasizes the cognitive performance scale, incorporating five components: attention, generalization of learning, learning rate, memory, and motivation.

Findings

A positive relationship was found between assistive technology and student performance across all areas (cognitive performance, psychomotor performance, and social performance). Assistive technology was reported to have a significant positive relationship with the cognitive performance components of memory, attention, and generalization of learning. AT was reported to have a positive but not statistically significant relationship with learning rate and motivation. The researchers reported that technological complexity can present a barrier for students with cognitive impairments. Information presented as non-text (i.e., graphics or video) reduced reliance on memory.