AA-AAAS Bibliography: Search

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833 results.
  • Alper, S., & Mills, K. (2001). Nonstandardized assessment in inclusive school settings. In S. Alper, D. L. Ryndak, & C. N. Schloss (Eds.), Alternate assessment of students with disabilities in inclusive settings (pp. 54–74). Allyn and Bacon.

  • Alper, S., Ryndak, D. L., & Schloss, C. N. (2001). Alternate assessment of students with disabilities in inclusive settings. Allyn & Bacon.

  • Altman, J. R., Lazarus, S. S., Quenemoen, R. F., Kearns, J., Quenemoen, M., & Thurlow, M. L. (2010). 2009 survey of states: Accomplishments and new issues at the end of a decade of change. University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. http://www.cehd.umn.edu/NCEO/OnlinePubs/2009StateSurvey.pdf

  • Alvarez, A. N. (2021). Filling the gap: Assessing academic proficiency of students with disabilities (Publication No. 28543214) [Doctoral dissertation, City University of Seattle]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global.

  • Ancelle, J. A. G. (2016). Assistive technologies at the edge of language and speech science for children with communication disorders: VocalID, Free Speech, and SmartPalate. In Information Resources Management Association (Ed.), Special and gifted education: Concepts, methodologies, tools, and applications: Vol. II (pp. 996–1019). Information Science Reference. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-5225-0034-6.ch042

  • Anders, S. B. (2015). Elementary and secondary special education teachers’ experiences of inclusion for students with moderate to severe disabilities: A phenomenological study (Publication No. 3737140) [Doctoral dissertation, Liberty University]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global. http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/doctoral/1095

  • Andersen, K., Levenson, L., & Blumberg, F. C. (2016). The promise and limitations of assistive technology use among children with autism. In Information Resources Management Association (Ed.), Special and gifted education: Concepts, methodologies, tools, and applications: Vol. II (pp. 740–759). Information Science Reference. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-5225-0034-6.ch032

  • Andersen, L., & Nash, B. (2016). Making science accessible to students with significant cognitive disabilities. Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities, 19(1), article 3. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107415324.004

  • Andersen, L., Nash, B. L., & Bechard, S. (2018). Articulating the validity evidence for a science alternate assessment. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 55(6), 826–848. https://doi.org/10.1002/tea.21441

  • Anderson, D., Farley, D., & Tindal, G. (2015). Test design considerations for students with significant cognitive disabilities. The Journal of Special Education, 49(1), 3–15. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022466913491834

  • Anderson, D., Lai, D.-F., Alonzo, J., & Tindal, G. (2011). Examining a grade-level math CBM designed for persistently low-performing students. Educational Assessment, 16(1), 15–34. https://doi.org/10.1080/10627197.2011.551084

  • Andzik, N. R., & Cannella-Malone, H. I. (2019). Practitioner implementation of communication intervention with students with complex communication needs. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 124(5), 395–410. https://doi.org/10.1352/1944-7558-124.5.395

  • Apanasionok, M. M., Alallawi, B., Grindle, C. F., Hastings, R. P., Watkins, R. C., Nicholls, G., Maguire, L., & Staunton, D. (2021). Teaching early numeracy to students with autism using a school staff delivery model. British Journal of Special Education, 48(1), 90–111. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8578.12346

  • Apanasionok, M. M., Neil, J., Watkins, R. C., Grindle, C. F., & Hastings, R. P. (2020). Teaching science to students with developmental disabilities using the Early Science curriculum. Support for Learning, 35(4), 493–505. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9604.12329

  • Apitz, M., Ruppar, A., Roessler, K., & Pickett, K. J. (2017). Planning lessons for students with significant disabilities in high school English classes. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 49(3), 168–174. https://doi.org/10.1177/0040059916654900

  • Arnold, S., & Reed, P. (2016). Reading assessments for students with ASD: A survey of summative reading assessments used in special educational schools in the UK. British Journal of Special Education, 43(2), 122–141. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8578.12127

  • Arthanat, S., Curtin, C., & Knotak, D. (2013). Comparative observations of learning engagement by students with development disabilities using an iPad and computer: A pilot study. Assistive Technology, 25(4), 204–213. https://doi.org/10.1080/10400435.2012.761293

  • Asaro-Saddler, K., & Bak, N. (2013). Persuasive writing and self-regulation training for writers with autism spectrum disorders. The Journal of Special Education, 48(2), 92–105. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022466912474101

  • Ault, M. J., Baggerman, M. A., & Horn, C. K. (2017). Effects of an app incorporating systematic instruction to teach spelling to students with developmental delays. Journal of Special Education Technology, 32(3), 123–137. https://doi.org/10.1177/0162643417696931

  • Ayres, K. M., Lowrey, K. A., Douglas, K. H., & Sievers, C. (2011). I can identify Saturn but I can’t brush my teeth: What happens when the curricular focus for students with severe disabilities shifts. Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 46(1), 11–21. http://www.daddcec.com/etadd.html